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Help needed aboutFrangipani

#1 User is offline   ming 

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Posted 17 June 2007 - 10:41 PM

Advise is needed here. Please help.

I have been growing a Frangipani Tree (Medium Size) in a large size pot (the old chinese brown large flower pot). Recently, i realized that the roots have actually grown out of the drainage holes. What should I do? Repotting woulde seems to be out of the question, as it's too big to repot, and it would also mean getting a even bigger flower pot. Is it possible to trim the roots? would it cause harm?

What should I do? any advise to this situation would be very much appreciated. thank you
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#2 User is offline   markc 

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Posted 18 June 2007 - 10:06 AM

Dig a hole, roll the plant in, (together with the pot) and break the pot before cover up.

The plant is meant for growing on ground. Else...... just sell off and buy a smaller one loh. Got things can control root grow but it will fall when the top become too massive.

This post has been edited by markc: 18 June 2007 - 10:20 AM

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#3 User is offline   Boon-kun 

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Posted 27 June 2007 - 10:59 PM

Yes, you can trim the roots, but not too much. Within the confines of the container would be OK. You may want to change to a bigger pot. Make sure to change the medium to clean mediums like burnt soil or vermiculite/perlite mix, so as to prevent the plant from getting infected from soil diseases. Water it lots, until water flows out from the bottom of the pot. Refrain from applying fertiliers, as it may burn the 'wounded' roots. Keep it in a semi-shade environment. Reduce the number of leaves. Hope this helps :)/>
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#4 User is offline   mtct83 

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Posted 28 June 2007 - 01:12 AM

Hi all,

was wondering if trimming the root plus shortening the branches of the tree so that it doesn't become top-heavy will help?
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#5 User is offline   Boon-kun 

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Posted 28 June 2007 - 10:27 AM

Halo mtct83. Well the theory behind it is pretty much like maintaining a bonsai, though I do not think the frangipani could be stunted for a very long time. You could support it with stilts should it start to tilt. Hope it helps :)/>
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#6 User is offline   noodle 

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Posted 28 June 2007 - 07:22 PM

hmm... i think for frangipani the best is try to use as big pot as possible as they do not like to be root bound....trimming may help to reduce the weight but not the best way to grow it i suppose...

Cheers!
Ian
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#7 User is offline   Guanster 

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Posted 29 June 2007 - 12:39 AM

maybe i should emphasize one one issue..for most bonsai plants..root triming is just a part of routine.


but..for plumeria...triming off roots is not ideal..as the plant will get shock n just die off..trim the top...have to handle with care too..the exposed wound may lead to virus attack n kill the plant too..




as for the pot..i sugget u leave it lor...no harm rather..if u try to do anything now..it is no point..cuz the root ald grown outwards into the ground isnt it?
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#8 User is offline   Boon-kun 

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Posted 29 June 2007 - 08:42 AM

View PostGuanster, on Jun 29 2007, 12:39 AM, said:

maybe i should emphasize one one issue..for most bonsai plants..root triming is just a part of routine.
but..for plumeria...triming off roots is not ideal..as the plant will get shock n just die off..trim the top...have to handle with care too..the exposed wound may lead to virus attack n kill the plant too..
as for the pot..i sugget u leave it lor...no harm rather..if u try to do anything now..it is no point..cuz the root ald grown outwards into the ground isnt it?


Halo Guanster,

I agree that trimming the Plumeria on a regular basis is not a normal practice. But the thread-starter's problem needed a jury-rig kind of solution. Trimming the roots and branches will not result in death of the plant, as long as the secetuars used is clean and the trimming is minimal. The medium need to be changed when the roots are trimmed and repotted to prevent infection.

There are very durable, light and high quality plastic pots available at nurseries, maybe you can check them out. Some are even bigger than those brown ceremic pots. Good morning! :)/>
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#9 User is offline   Guanster 

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Posted 29 June 2007 - 11:35 AM

god morning..yeap..i think he need to judge whether..is changin a pot really necessary..cuz...there is not end to changing pot...

but..the triming of roots..if he isnt experienced in triming plants roots..i rather he don touch it..if not fatal things may happen lor
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#10 User is offline   Nicholas 

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Posted 10 July 2007 - 10:43 PM

Is there anything we can apply to the part of the branch that we have just hacked to prevent virus attack?

I think to ensure using a clean and sterile saw is a near impossible task for me.
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#11 User is offline   pino 

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Posted 11 July 2007 - 10:48 AM

apply fungicides & cover it with a plastic bag.
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