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Lime Tree Propagation

#1 User is offline   kaidaa88 

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Posted 12 December 2006 - 03:02 PM

Does anyone knows how to propagate a Lime tree( which bears the lime fruit ) I have one lime tree at home and for years it had not been bearing fruits. Can anyone help me?
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#2 User is offline   Maddie Tham 

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Posted 12 December 2006 - 03:21 PM

Hi Kaidaa88

Is ur lime tree a kaffir lime or the chinese new year type which is calamondin? The calamondins should be free fruiting but the kaffir lime may not fruit easily. Mine has not fruited in 6yrs but I use the leaves only for cooking so am not very sad about it.
But I have seen a huge kaffir lime tree at the corner of Siglap road that has branches laden with the fruit. Can anyone tell me if there is such a thing as a male or female kaffir lime?
This might explain why kaidaa's and my plant do not fruit.

Rgds
Maddie
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#3 User is offline   bluefly 

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Posted 12 December 2006 - 04:04 PM

Hi!
I have encountered the male papaya tree and male rambutan tree before but not for the case of lime tree.

kaidaa88:

The fastest way to reproduce the lime tree is by marcotting. Quite a simple method. Select a healthy branch and remove a port of its bark (ring for about 1" length) and warpped it with soil. You can use coconut husk or plastic sheet to keep the soil in place and tied with string/wire to secure it. The roots should form in 3 to 4 months time. You can cut the branch for planting once the roots are fully developed.

Some sample pictures to share..

Marcotting using ordinary soil from the ground and covered by plastic sheet..
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v328/bluefly227/Marcotting-1.jpg

Roots could be seen after 3 months.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v328/bluefly227/Marcotting-2.jpg

This post has been edited by bluefly: 12 December 2006 - 04:09 PM

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#4 User is offline   mm 

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Posted 12 December 2006 - 08:55 PM

Perhaps if you post a photo of your lime tree, we'll be able to tell better.

It's rather unusual for a regular local lime tree to be barren for so many years. I seen even neglected diseased ones produce fruits, although not as abundantly.

Perhaps you're feeding it too well - with too much nitrogen-rich fertiliser.

Now, is your concern primarily on how to get it to bear fruit or on how to get more plants?

As Bluefly has suggested, marcotting works best for limes. They take to marcotting well, and root readily (although they are slow about it). Using rooting hormone powder helps as well.
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#5 User is offline   kaidaa88 

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Posted 13 December 2006 - 12:19 PM

Maddie Tham, I don't really know it is a kaffir lime or chinese new year type. I only know that it is green and has a shape of the sphere. I also do not use the leaves of the lime tree to cook. The leaf is green and quite small, about the size of your thumb.

Thanks, bluefly, but I don't know where to get a coconut husk.

mm, I sad to say that I do not have a digital camera. My lime tree was really a worm-infested tree. It have many leaves that was eaten ny worms, not the whole leaf, but just a hole on the leaf, or a little larger than a hole. And to be frank, I rarely feed my lime tree with fertilisers. It happens years ago when I place fertilisers around the roots of one of my favourite plant, the chili and it look dying on the second day and died on the third day. I seldom feed my plants with fertilisers after that.

I actually wanted the fruits for eating and not to reproduce. I have actually two or three lime tree at my home already.

This post has been edited by kaidaa88: 13 December 2006 - 12:24 PM

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#6 User is offline   Boon-kun 

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Posted 05 July 2007 - 11:52 PM

Halo kaidaa88. Since you probably have a 'worm' problem, and don't know when they came from, I recommend you change the medium and repot the plant. While you're at it, add some fertilisers which is formulated to induce fruiting. Those fertilisers are easily available at nurseries.

For extra measure, spray persticide on it and the surroundings. Make sure to wash the lime thoroughly after harvesting it! Hope this helps :)/>
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#7 User is offline   Shireen 

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Posted 06 July 2007 - 12:53 AM

View Postkaidaa88, on Dec 13 2006, 12:19 PM, said:

Maddie Tham, I don't really know it is a kaffir lime or chinese new year type. I only know that it is green and has a shape of the sphere. I also do not use the leaves of the lime tree to cook. The leaf is green and quite small, about the size of your thumb.

And to be frank, I rarely feed my lime tree with fertilisers. It happens years ago when I place fertilisers around the roots of one of my favourite plant, the chili and it look dying on the second day and died on the third day. I seldom feed my plants with fertilisers after that.

I actually wanted the fruits for eating and not to reproduce. I have actually two or three lime tree at my home already.

The kaffir lime or daun limau purut (Citrus x hystrix)has guitar-shaped leaves and is very fragrant, used for cooking dishes like Ayam Kleo. Calamondin is a cross between the kumquat and tangerine (C. x mitis) and has ovate/elliptical leaves. Doesn't sound like yours is either though spherical leaves sound unusual.

Maddie Tham, you only need one plant to bear fruit. It's just that from seed, it can take 7 or 8 years and it probably does better in the ground than in a container.
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#8 User is offline   Shireen 

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Posted 06 July 2007 - 12:55 AM

View Postkaidaa88, on Dec 13 2006, 12:19 PM, said:

Maddie Tham, I don't really know it is a kaffir lime or chinese new year type. I only know that it is green and has a shape of the sphere. I also do not use the leaves of the lime tree to cook. The leaf is green and quite small, about the size of your thumb.

And to be frank, I rarely feed my lime tree with fertilisers. It happens years ago when I place fertilisers around the roots of one of my favourite plant, the chili and it look dying on the second day and died on the third day. I seldom feed my plants with fertilisers after that.

I actually wanted the fruits for eating and not to reproduce. I have actually two or three lime tree at my home already.

The kaffir lime or daun limau purut (Citrus x hystrix)has guitar-shaped leaves and is very fragrant, used for cooking dishes like Ayam Kleo. Calamondin is a cross between the kumquat and tangerine (C. x mitis) and has ovate/elliptical leaves. Doesn't sound like yours is either though spherical leaves sound unusual.

Maddie Tham, you only need one plant to bear fruit. It's just that from seed, it can take 7 or 8 years and it probably does better in the ground than in a container.
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#9 User is offline   Shireen 

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Posted 06 July 2007 - 01:09 AM

Oops. Posted same thing twice. Sorry. I came on this about citrus also:

http://msucares.com/...tions/p1779.htm

It says citrus are self-fruiting but if you have two trees it does better at fruiting.
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#10 User is offline   vanessafrida 

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 12:10 PM

View PostMaddie Tham, on Dec 12 2006, 03:21 PM, said:

Hi Kaidaa88

Is ur lime tree a kaffir lime or the chinese new year type which is calamondin? The calamondins should be free fruiting but the kaffir lime may not fruit easily. Mine has not fruited in 6yrs but I use the leaves only for cooking so am not very sad about it.
But I have seen a huge kaffir lime tree at the corner of Siglap road that has branches laden with the fruit. Can anyone tell me if there is such a thing as a male or female kaffir lime?
This might explain why kaidaa's and my plant do not fruit.

Rgds
Maddie


Hi there, i so so so want a kaffir plant for the leaves (cooking). Could you please share with me where exactly in siglap is this lime tree? I would love to take a cutting and try growing it.... thank you so much!
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#11 User is offline   mm 

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 12:19 PM

View Postvanessafrida, on Mar 26 2008, 12:10 PM, said:

Hi there, i so so so want a kaffir plant for the leaves (cooking). Could you please share with me where exactly in siglap is this lime tree? I would love to take a cutting and try growing it.... thank you so much!

I suspect that tree probably belongs to someone, so it's not like you could just snip off a bit and plant. :D/> In any case, kaffir limes need to be marcotted, and won't grow from a cutting. In fact, even for marcottings, they are notoriously slow to root. They are also slow growing. You might be better off to just buy a plant from a nursery. They shouldn't be too expensive, and since you're planning to harvest the leaves for cooking, you should plan to get a larger one since they they are slow growing.
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#12 User is offline   vanessafrida 

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 01:18 PM

View Postmm, on Mar 26 2008, 12:19 PM, said:

I suspect that tree probably belongs to someone, so it's not like you could just snip off a bit and plant. :D/> In any case, kaffir limes need to be marcotted, and won't grow from a cutting. In fact, even for marcottings, they are notoriously slow to root. They are also slow growing. You might be better off to just buy a plant from a nursery. They shouldn't be too expensive, and since you're planning to harvest the leaves for cooking, you should plan to get a larger one since they they are slow growing.


Thank you for taking the time to reply to my question. :)/>

I have been trying to find a kaffir plant and a bay leaf plant with no such luck. I regret not buying the bay leaf plant from FEF a year ago....:(/>

Any idea where I can start looking to purchase these two plants? I love them for cooking
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#13 User is offline   green lantern 

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 01:27 PM

i once bought the large lime from ntuc and then just threw the seeds into my pot of pandan. the lime plant that grew had the guitar shaped leaves. unfortunately, it attracted too many butterflies and i got rid of the plant.

i had also wanted to have the plant to use the leaves.

am trying to plant the seeds from some fresh lime i bought recently. hope it grows.
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#14 User is offline   mm 

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 01:27 PM

Hi. You could try calling World Farm (67520500) to check if they have stock. They would probably know the kaffir lime better as limau purut. :D/>
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#15 User is offline   vanessafrida 

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 01:37 PM

View Postgreen lantern, on Mar 26 2008, 01:27 PM, said:

i once bought the large lime from ntuc and then just threw the seeds into my pot of pandan. the lime plant that grew had the guitar shaped leaves. unfortunately, it attracted too many butterflies and i got rid of the plant.

i had also wanted to have the plant to use the leaves.

am trying to plant the seeds from some fresh lime i bought recently. hope it grows.


exciting stuff! I am going to try planting my lime leaf seeds too...good luck!
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#16 User is offline   vanessafrida 

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 01:43 PM

View Postmm, on Mar 26 2008, 01:27 PM, said:

Hi. You could try calling World Farm (67520500) to check if they have stock. They would probably know the kaffir lime better as limau purut. :D/>


Thank you so much! I will drop them a line. exciting stuff!
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#17 User is offline   Shireen 

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 11:54 PM

I am surprised that you have not been able to find the kaffir lime plant in your regular nurseries. I saw one at the Tampines bazaar today where a temp plant stall had been set up. My regular plant guy at Marine Terrace market also sells them every now and then and I know I have seen them sold at the nurseries in Bedok. Of course, you may be unlucky and hit a 'dry' patch just at the time you want one but it is quite commonly sold so if you live far from World Farm, it may not be necessary to traipse there.

My neighbour who has been growing this plant a long time says that the best plants are grown from seed but the fruit must have been ripened on the tree until it is quite yellowy and not green in order for the seeds to be viable. Also they take a long time to germinate, like most lime seeds. She tossed hers into a pot and ignored them for a month or two and they popped out suddenly. My key lime seeds and Meyer lemon seeds took weeks and months to germinate and grow.
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#18 User is offline   fluffymutt 

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Posted 08 July 2008 - 12:00 PM

May I ask if kaffir lime is the same as the "Oriental Lime" which is used in the Heaven and Earth Green Tea? The one with really nice smelling light green leaves with big thorns? I have one of those which has very few leaves and looks like a basket case but I'd like to revive it. Any tips for a "miracle awakening"?

Thanks!
Fluff
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#19 User is offline   mato 

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Posted 09 July 2008 - 08:56 AM

Hi all
I have three lime plants.
Plant no.1 which is also called calamansi bought from neighbourhood pasar malam.After 1st and 2nd harvestings it did not fruit anymore.Yesterday added bonemeal hope it works.

Plant no.2 another calamansi from seed very good growth but yet to fruit.Read from book, even though it may flower but may not be able to fruit. I wonder is there any truth in the statement?

Plant no.3 is kumquat aquired many years ago its still going strong with occasional fruiting.

cheers :D/>
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#20 User is offline   WeeSN 

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Posted 12 April 2009 - 06:40 PM

Hi,

I am so happy to find this discussion, I posted earlier regarding my limau kasturi/calamansi plant and did not get any replies.
My calamansi plant is not growing well, many of its leaves recently turned yellow. How often should I water it? I fertilise once in 2 weeks.
Advice appreciated.
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