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Butterfly pea - Clitoria

#61 User is offline   begonia 

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Posted 14 November 2006 - 01:08 PM

How to use the Clitoria flower as Litmus Paper.

Teachers and students. Take a few of the blue Clitoria flowers. Put them in a transparent glass. Add some water. Crush it. The water will turn a blue colour. Strain the flower petals out from the water. Viola! You are done. To use it as Litmus Paper, add something acidic like lemon juice. The water will turn red! Now add soap solution. It will turn blue again. Add vinegar now and it'll turn red. I leave it to you to think why it's called 'Clitoria'.

This post has been edited by begonia: 27 November 2006 - 11:29 PM

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#62 User is offline   Neverend 

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Posted 15 November 2006 - 04:37 PM

Omg it really can be used as litmus paper?! I sure didn't know that :o/>

Well, I think anyone with a background in science should know why it's called that :lol:/>
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#63 User is offline   Bernard Teo 

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Posted 16 November 2006 - 02:28 PM

I believe we owe a lot of botanical taxonomy to one Carl Linnaeus - a Swedish scientist. Among other works he did in this area, he advocated a "natural principle" of defining classifications based on plant reproductive organs - i.e. the flowers - resulting in rather descriptive latinized terms of male bits and female bits. But many believe that Linnaeus had a sense of humour (or perhaps just lewd, depending on the point of view) , and came up with creatively shocking and descriptive names for his own amusement. If I recalled my biology lessons correctly, Linneaus original classifications had other descriptors along the lines of the number of husbands (stamens) and wives (pistils) sharing the bed (the flower) - something considered risque in his day. Along the way, Linneaus was also apt to come up with suggestive names for new plants. The genus Clitoria is a much cited example.
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#64 User is offline   limxuanhong 

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Posted 16 November 2006 - 08:38 PM

Just curious...How many organisms did Linnaeus classify? :huh:/>
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#65 User is offline   Bernard Teo 

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Posted 17 November 2006 - 01:45 PM

Probably a lot. Linnaeus, it seemed, was some kind of central database on taxonomy and field naturalists out in the far flung reaches of the European trade empire and colonies would send Linnaeus specimens for classification. And he did, sometimes descriptively, other times on whimsy - after friends, foes or anatomical bits. References texts generally post-fix a L or Linn on species that are attributed to have been first classified by Linnaeus, e.g. Clitoria mariana L.. This particular specie was incidentally supposedly named by Linnaeus in honour of his mistress. Perhaps he had fond memories ;)/>

Incidentally, Linnaeus may have been the first, but certainly not the last of botanists and biologists to coin suggestive names. The Aroid genus Amorphophallus - meaning "shapeless male member" can provide much entertainment. And especially if they have species such as titanum, impressus, maximus, elegans, pygmaeus, odoratus, pendulus, rugosus , which may translate roughly to large, impressive, greatest, elegant, small/little, fragrant, dangling and wrinkled :lol:/>
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#66 User is offline   limxuanhong 

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Posted 17 November 2006 - 05:21 PM

I see....did he classify us, Homo sapiens? :lol:/>
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#67 User is offline   Bernard Teo 

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Posted 18 November 2006 - 10:38 AM

Yes. Homo Sapiens = "wise human". He also proposed 4 subdivisions of Homo Sapiens characterized by skin and behaviour - Europeans - white, civilized, inventive, Africans - black, lazy,impulsive, Americans (native) - reddish, quick tempered, and Asians - yellowish, money-faced, conceited.

But I think we are deviating from the subject of Clitoria :offtopic:/>
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#68 User is offline   Velvetine 

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Posted 27 November 2006 - 02:21 PM

Hi LM. I have always planted my seeds directly into the soil so I think if you want to tranplant it from wool to soil, it'll be okay.

I've got single petalled blue pea on my wooden frames and the double variety on the fence. It'll be a good source of colouring for kueh makers needing blue colouring.
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#69 User is offline   limxuanhong 

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Posted 28 November 2006 - 10:57 AM

View PostLM, on Nov 18 2006, 11:18 AM, said:

Hi.. thanks all for the advice.... the first true leaves of my first seedling has appeared and today i potted them into the soil... but there was a slight glitch (first time i am doing this).... as i used cotton wool to germinate the seed... when i was trying to pot the seedling into the soil, i realised the roots were stuck to the cotton wool.. and when i gave it a slight tug, a bit of the main root broke off.. :(/> so in the end i had to cut the cotton wool around the roots and potted the seedling (with part of the root broken and with a small chunk of cotton wool)... my silly questions: 1)will the seedling survive with part of the root broken? 2)is it alright to have the cotton wool with the root in the soil?

For the rest of my seeds still in the cotton wool, shld i keep the cotton wool reasonably wet or shld i not water it too much? or shld i just transplant the seed (not yet germinated) into the soil now??

thanks...


Hi LM, I think it is fine to leave the wool attached....its better than breaking the root! :lol:/> But I plant seeds directly in soil ^_^/>

As to whether your seed will survive, it depends on how much of the root u broke....hope all grows well :D/>
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#70 User is offline   Jo Cheong 

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Posted 16 September 2017 - 07:58 PM

How much flowers do you need? I'm trying to propagate loads of them. Maybe we can work something out. Sorry, I can't give it to you for free as the plants belongs to the RC. I don't use pesticides on them. :cool:
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Hi Vel, not sure if u r still on this forum. If yes, please sell me some organic butterfly pea flower! Thanks much!
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