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is etlingera elatior a invasive plant?

#1 User is offline   pino 

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Posted 29 August 2006 - 11:36 AM

hi i have a etlingera elatior. i have been planting it on a big pot, having afternoon sun.
it has not been growing very well.
i am thinking of planting it on the ground but worry that it may be as invasive as the costus & heliconia.
any advise?
tks.
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#2 User is offline   mm 

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Posted 29 August 2006 - 12:08 PM

Pino - it can be invasive, as it spreads by underground rhizomes, just like the other 2, but it's relatively slow growing, so you can enjoy it in the ground for a couple of years. You can then go in an cut it back after that, or dig up and replant. You should have several plants by then.

Choose a spot with some morning sun, and bright / dappled sun for the rest of the day. And feed them well, and keep the soil moist.
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#3 Guestryan_*

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Posted 29 August 2006 - 08:59 PM

hey pino,

my experiece with the etlingeria elatior is one of the most enjoyable i've had for any plant. invasive? not really lah. if it were THAT invasive, i'd be super common and everywhere right? really, its not as common as it should be, compared to the super rampant Heliconia psittacorums that can push down retaining walls.

MM: yep, they do grow from rhizomes with the huge pseudostems made from modified leaf sheaths reaching anywere from 1.5 to 3 m, depending on the cultivar. the reds thend to get taller although the pinks are the most floriferous. however most of the time, these rhizomes are not underground but on soil level, so its interesting to follow the plant's direction of growth.

i think they do better in the grd, although i start off rhizomes that i periodically give away in 6 inch pots with an organic based media (although really, they're not fussy). however they do enjoy heavy feeding of bonemeal and copious amts of water. pertaining sun, they can be grown in full sun. mercilessly. if you need an area to be shaded, they will be the shade that blocks out the sun, eventually with their graceful arching fronds. they flower better in the sun too.

im really proud that this plant is native to our region. no wonder its the hallmark of the ginger garden at sbg (although you dont really see the plants per se there).
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#4 User is offline   pino 

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Posted 29 August 2006 - 09:26 PM

mm & ryan,

tks for the info!
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#5 Guestryan_*

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Posted 29 August 2006 - 10:30 PM

hey pino, no prob. if you're interested (or if yours dies, does not do well) i can pass you segments of the quite nice pink one i have to try.
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#6 User is offline   pino 

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Posted 30 August 2006 - 10:55 AM

View Postryan, on Aug 29 2006, 10:30 PM, said:

hey pino, no prob. if you're interested (or if yours dies, does not do well) i can pass you segments of the quite nice pink one i have to try.


sure. tks. but need to consult dear wife 1st...... :(/> :(/> :(/>
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#7 Guestryan_*

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Posted 30 August 2006 - 11:20 AM

aiyah, i teach you, like i have taught rockhop. take from me first and ask later. haha
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#8 User is offline   deTengs 

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Posted 30 August 2006 - 10:01 PM

the other way is to get more 'nam keong' (cantonese) the next time u are cooking curry...conveniently plonk one generous section into the soil and u will get ur sample! :rolleyes:/> it will take some time to grow large n by that time, ur wife will probably have fallen in love with it!
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#9 User is offline   pino 

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Posted 31 August 2006 - 10:56 AM

View Postryan, on Aug 30 2006, 11:20 AM, said:

aiyah, i teach you, like i have taught rockhop. take from me first and ask later. haha



in tat case, why not..... hehehehehe.
just pm u.
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Posted 31 August 2006 - 02:55 PM

i guess the nam keong is alpinia galanga right? and not the etlingera elatior. wilson taught there were synonymous on one of the other threads i guess.
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#11 User is offline   deTengs 

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Posted 31 August 2006 - 09:18 PM

View Postryan, on Aug 31 2006, 02:55 PM, said:

i guess the nam keong is alpinia galanga right? and not the etlingera elatior. wilson taught there were synonymous on one of the other threads i guess.


eh...nam keong is etlingera elatior...it's the one where the inflorescence is used for rojak too! It should not be the same as alpinia galanga though both are also used for curries......
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Posted 31 August 2006 - 09:40 PM

detengs: geezzz. didnt know that. etlingera elatior rhizomes are so terribly fibrous. gee. tey will break your teeth.... judging by the way i struggle to cut segments out. hows your white one doing?
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#13 User is offline   deTengs 

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Posted 31 August 2006 - 10:37 PM

View Postryan, on Aug 31 2006, 09:40 PM, said:

detengs: geezzz. didnt know that. etlingera elatior rhizomes are so terribly fibrous. gee. tey will break your teeth.... judging by the way i struggle to cut segments out. hows your white one doing?

:lol:/> it's the unopened inflorescence tt's used in rojak, ryan...not the rhizomes...they are finely grated to make ur plate of rojak smell and taste wonderful...

my white elatior's fine... coming to 30 feet tall with at least an inflorescence at any time. Any interesting etlingera or zingiber u acquired lately?
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#14 User is offline   mm 

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Posted 31 August 2006 - 11:35 PM

View PostdeTengs, on Aug 31 2006, 10:37 PM, said:

my white elatior's fine... coming to 30 feet tall with at least an inflorescence at any time.

30ft tall ! ! ! ? I thought these guys grow to about 15 ft max only. 30 feet is huge. How thick are the stems that can support this height? I mean, their stems are almost succulent, and not woody, so it must be really thick to support such great heights.

I just bought a small one from WF - only 4 ft tall. Now I wonder how long it'll take to get to 30ft!

My pinks and reds are now about 12 ft, with one about 15ft. But, I'll say again, 30ft? Wow! :o/> :o/> :o/>
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#15 User is offline   deTengs 

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Posted 01 September 2006 - 11:46 AM

:huh:/> well...my specimen is planted in the ground...and maybe i just got lucky picking the right spot...i've not been to my garden in Malaysia for the past few weeks and got a shock when i reached home. They seemed huge and looming. It's kinda difficult to really tell accurately when they huge and looming.

mm, u can see large ones in Nuansa Bali in Jalan Kayu. Those are twenty-over feet too. Haven't been there for ages but I hope they're still there. The other way is to go into jungle. Been to a trip with my frens and there's even more humongous etlingeras in there. Some look like near to 40 - 45 ft!

This post has been edited by deTengs: 01 September 2006 - 11:47 AM

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