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Germination Using Wool Algae Problem

#1 User is offline   Dennis The Menace 

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Posted 10 December 2015 - 10:19 AM

I notice many of you germinate your seeds on wool. I do the same but I have this problem when i start giving the seedling diluted nutrients after the true leaves appear. Sometime the algae becomes too much that it cause deficiency in the seedling. Do you have this problem? How do you resolve it.

The algae problem will not be an issue once the seedling get a grip and start growing fast. But i do lose some seedling as they becomes stunted which i believe is due to the algae.
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#2 User is offline   LimSan 

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Posted 10 December 2015 - 10:41 AM

For me, I hold on to the seedling and spray the sponge surface with hose, especially those that are exposed like my DIY Hydroponic Growing Bottles (can be seen clearly on my video especially the strawberry plantlet)
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#3 User is offline   sthh 

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Posted 10 December 2015 - 11:07 AM

When true leaves appear, it is time to concentrate on the roots growth. The roots must penetrate the wool, and grow into the nutrient solution supported by clay balls or other medium. Eventually, the wool and clayballs should be dry when the roots have reached the reservoir. It is not intended for the wool to remain wet and remain as the growing medium itself.
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#4 User is offline   Dennis The Menace 

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Posted 10 December 2015 - 11:13 AM

View PostLimSan, on 10 December 2015 - 10:41 AM, said:

For me, I hold on to the seedling and spray the sponge surface with hose, especially those that are exposed like my DIY Hydroponic Growing Bottles (can be seen clearly on my video especially the strawberry plantlet)


That will be a fine balancing act to hose the wool hard enough to remove the algae but at the same time trying not to kill or hose away the seedling :D/>
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#5 User is offline   Dennis The Menace 

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Posted 10 December 2015 - 11:21 AM

View Poststhh, on 10 December 2015 - 11:07 AM, said:

When true leaves appear, it is time to concentrate on the roots growth. The roots must penetrate the wool, and grow into the nutrient solution supported by clay balls or other medium. Eventually, the wool and clayballs should be dry when the roots have reached the reservoir. It is not intended for the wool to remain wet and remain as the growing medium itself.


The problem occurs during the 3 to 4 weeks where the root is just out but not strong enough for me to leave wool dry.

Once enough or thicker root grows i will slowly lower the netrients. By then the leaves have also spread out and fully shade the wool and block the lights off the algae,from then onward it won't be a problem.

It only that duration, thats i face that problem.
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#6 User is offline   sthh 

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Posted 10 December 2015 - 11:26 AM

View PostDennis The Menace, on 10 December 2015 - 11:21 AM, said:

The problem occurs during the 3 to 4 weeks where the root is just out but not strong enough for me to leave wool dry.

Once enough or thicker root grows i will slowly lower the netrients. By then the leaves have also spread out and fully shade the wool and block the lights off the algae,from then onward it won't be a problem.

It only that duration, thats i face that problem.


In that case, don't give any nutrient. Just use water. The seedling will outgrow the algae if there is no nutrient to begin with, and seedlings usually comes with enough food in the little seed package .
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#7 User is offline   Dennis The Menace 

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Posted 10 December 2015 - 11:33 AM

View Poststhh, on 10 December 2015 - 11:26 AM, said:

In that case, don't give any nutrient. Just use water. The seedling will outgrow the algae if there is no nutrient to begin with, and seedlings usually comes with enough food in the little seed package .


I guess thats the best option. To give them netrient later. I might just start another batch of seeds to see if there is any difference.
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#8 User is offline   LimSan 

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Posted 10 December 2015 - 11:59 AM

View PostDennis The Menace, on 10 December 2015 - 11:13 AM, said:

That will be a fine balancing act to hose the wool hard enough to remove the algae but at the same time trying not to kill or hose away the seedling :D/>/>

Yep.. What I did was use the flat part of my tweezer to block the spray water on the weak stem.. it work on all my hydroponic seedlings wools that got algae!
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#9 User is offline   Dennis The Menace 

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Posted 11 December 2015 - 12:49 AM

View PostLimSan, on 10 December 2015 - 11:59 AM, said:

Yep.. What I did was use the flat part of my tweezer to block the spray water on the weak stem.. it work on all my hydroponic seedlings wools that got algae!


Thanks for the tip but i think it'll be quite impossible for me to do it this way, :D/> some of my seedling are really really small, like strawberries seedling and the wool they're on is max 1cm by 1cm. Pretty hard to focus a spray with the hoses i have :)/>
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