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My Learning Garden

#41 User is offline   sthh 

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 11:38 AM

View PostGraceS, on 27 January 2015 - 11:34 PM, said:

My tallest hydroponic cherry tomato plant is now 1.83 m tall. The first set of flowers have dried and dropped off 2 weeks ago and I can barely see tiny green dots which I hope will grow and give me tomatoes. How long will it take from the time the flowers dropped off to the harvesting of fruits? A second set of flowers are blooming now and I can also see a third set of flower buds development on a sucker on the plant.

The rest of the hydroponic cherry tomato plants were topped and are around 3 to 3.5 bft tall. They are flowering or going to flower soon (keeping my fingers crossed). On the contrary, those grown in potted soil at the same location are weak, small and slow growing in comparison. They are also most attacked by white flies and blight. One of them suffered from root rot and died probably from over watering. This is my second attempt growing in soil and do not have success so far. At this stage, none of them look promising to grow and flower. Thinking of moving some of them to hydroponics and see what happens.

I respect gardeners who can yield tomatoes successfully. I realised that there is a lot of hard work combating common diseases and weather. They can kill or weaken the plants quite fast. The nice tasting home grown fruits probably make the efforts worth the while. The experiments have been fulfillings and thanks to stth, Robert and fellow gardeners who have contributed to the learning journey for me and my son. Wish me luck!


Keep the weaker plants around to attract the pest, and the stronger plants will be pest free. Pest tends to attack weaker plants. Tomatos will take 1 to 2 months to form, but take quite a while to ripen.
I usually keep them on the vine even after they turn red for 2 weeks more, so that they are sweeter. Go thru all the flowers with a vibrating toothbrush, and you will have a bigger harvest.

Don't bother to repot those soil-grown tomatoes in hydroponic.
To have shorter and fruiting cherry tomatoes, snip off some tomato suckers from your hydroponic tomatoes that are flowering and root them in water.
Then you will have fruiting tomatoes that are not so tall, which you can grow hydroponically. It is also a very fast way to propagate your tomatoes without having to grow them from seeds all over again.

Here's a tomato sucker:
http://i498.photobucket.com/albums/rr346/trelch/STHH0760_zps6d8e7f21.jpg
It is fruiting profusely after growing hydroponically at only 3ft tall
http://i498.photobucket.com/albums/rr346/trelch/STHH0757_zps62338056.jpg

This post has been edited by sthh: 28 January 2015 - 11:43 AM

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#42 User is offline   GraceS 

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 02:39 PM

Will try that. Thanks.
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#43 User is offline   bleucheeze 

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 04:26 PM

View PostGraceS, on 27 January 2015 - 11:34 PM, said:

My tallest hydroponic cherry tomato plant is now 1.83 m tall. The first set of flowers have dried and dropped off 2 weeks ago and I can barely see tiny green dots which I hope will grow and give me tomatoes. How long will it take from the time the flowers dropped off to the harvesting of fruits? A second set of flowers are blooming now and I can also see a third set of flower buds development on a sucker on the plant.

The rest of the hydroponic cherry tomato plants were topped and are around 3 to 3.5 bft tall. They are flowering or going to flower soon (keeping my fingers crossed). On the contrary, those grown in potted soil at the same location are weak, small and slow growing in comparison. They are also most attacked by white flies and blight. One of them suffered from root rot and died probably from over watering. This is my second attempt growing in soil and do not have success so far. At this stage, none of them look promising to grow and flower. Thinking of moving some of them to hydroponics and see what happens.

I respect gardeners who can yield tomatoes successfully. I realised that there is a lot of hard work combating common diseases and weather. They can kill or weaken the plants quite fast. The nice tasting home grown fruits probably make the efforts worth the while. The experiments have been fulfillings and thanks to stth, Robert and fellow gardeners who have contributed to the learning journey for me and my son. Wish me luck!


Hmm, better to separate the hydroponics and soil grown tomato plants in case the white flies decide to hop onto the hydroponic one?

I used to have 2 different cherry tomato plants, both grew quite tall and fruited though there were white flies. Then they slowly died after I harvested tomatoes, no more new flowers after that! Some of the shoots turned weak and dropped off, so I decided to part with them since it's quite vexing to wipe off white flies almost every day.

Hope your hydroponic tomato keep going strong!
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#44 User is offline   GraceS 

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Posted 31 January 2015 - 12:57 AM

Apart from picking my greens for juicing every morning, I made a salad for dinner on Thursday with vegetables grown in the soil and hydroponics

Ingredients :
Greens grown in hydroponics : Malabar Spinach, Kangkong, Amaranth and Dill
Fruits and vegetables grown in soil: Sweet potato leaves, Gouji berry Leaves, Baby Bak Choy, Roselle leaves and Lime(to soak and wash vegetables)
Store bought vegetables and fruits: Cucumber, Carrot and Hawthorne
Salad dressing: Apple cider vinegar, fruit enzyme and mayonnaise

http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e308/graces10/2015-01-29GardenSaladPicking_zpsaacb051a.jpg
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#45 User is offline   Robert1943 

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Posted 31 January 2015 - 07:00 AM

View PostGraceS, on 31 January 2015 - 12:57 AM, said:

Apart from picking my greens for juicing every morning, I made a salad for dinner on Thursday with vegetables grown in the soil and hydroponics

Ingredients :
Greens grown in hydroponics : Malabar Spinach, Kangkong, Amaranth and Dill
Fruits and vegetables grown in soil: Sweet potato leaves, Gouji berry Leaves, Baby Bak Choy, Roselle leaves and Lime(to soak and wash vegetables)
Store bought vegetables and fruits: Cucumber, Carrot and Hawthorne
Salad dressing: Apple cider vinegar, fruit enzyme and mayonnaise

http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e308/graces10/2015-01-29GardenSaladPicking_zpsaacb051a.jpg


I must ask my wife to use Kang Kong in salads , she normally stir fries only, obviously it is good in salads also.
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#46 User is offline   sthh 

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Posted 31 January 2015 - 09:12 AM

View PostGraceS, on 31 January 2015 - 12:57 AM, said:

Apart from picking my greens for juicing every morning, I made a salad for dinner on Thursday with vegetables grown in the soil and hydroponics

Ingredients :
Greens grown in hydroponics : Malabar Spinach, Kangkong, Amaranth and Dill
Fruits and vegetables grown in soil: Sweet potato leaves, Gouji berry Leaves, Baby Bak Choy, Roselle leaves and Lime(to soak and wash vegetables)
Store bought vegetables and fruits: Cucumber, Carrot and Hawthorne
Salad dressing: Apple cider vinegar, fruit enzyme and mayonnaise

http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e308/graces10/2015-01-29GardenSaladPicking_zpsaacb051a.jpg


Looks yummy, I love to eat salad. However, my family still don't really like malabar spinach, due to it's slimy nature, so I stopped growing it already.
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#47 User is offline   Robert1943 

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Posted 31 January 2015 - 10:13 AM

View Poststhh, on 31 January 2015 - 09:12 AM, said:

Looks yummy, I love to eat salad. However, my family still don't really like malabar spinach, due to it's slimy nature, so I stopped growing it already.


Yes I grew once and agree slimy plus it is a creeper and grew everywhere.
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#48 User is offline   Wisteria 

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Posted 31 January 2015 - 10:45 AM

View PostGraceS, on 19 December 2014 - 02:27 PM, said:

Hi Robert
The Africa Leave plant or 南非叶 or Lam Fei Yip or Gynura procumbens is a medicinal plant said to help to lower blood pressure and cholesterol and other health claims. The Africans eat it as a vegetable. According to traditional Chinese medicine, the leaves are bitter and "cooling" in nature. Those with weaker body constitution or "cooling body" may experience giddyness if consumed frequently or in larger quantities. The leaves are best eaten raw. The fresh leaves can be juiced with green apple to drink in the morning on an empty stomach. The dried leaves can be boiled to make tea. Those who cannot bear the bitterness could grind the dried leaves into powder and put it in capsules. Afew of my relatives managed to lower their blood pressure and cholestrol after taking this but one should not stop seeking professional treatment and advice. Depending on the size of the leaves, 3 to 7 leaves a day is the common practice but one should always listen to their own body.


Africa Leave plant or 南非叶's botanical name is Vernonia amygdalina, not Gynura procumbens.
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#49 User is offline   GraceS 

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Posted 02 February 2015 - 10:29 AM

Yesterday morning, I was happily looking at my tallest tomato plant. The largest tomato is now 5mm and 2 bunches of fruits were developing. There are also 2 sets of flowers developing and I was looking forward to 4 sets of tomatoes. The day was very sunny and extremely windy. I took another look before noon and to my dismay the top of the plant and most of the leaves have gone limp. I suspected the weather as the water level is fine. The plant did not recover even after I have moved it indoors. Yesterday night, I steeled my heart to chop off the top together with a set of flowers and snipped off some limped and dried leaves. This morning, some flowers and fruits have dropped off. It is in ICU now and looks like it may not make it. Boohoohoo....my consolation is that I have afew more plants at the flowering and fruiting stage.

Lessons learnt:
1. It would be better to top the cherry tomato plant to stop it from growing so tall and promote flowering at lower height. The flowering stage would only be slightly delayed but you get a stronger stem that need only be supported at taller heights. It would also be easier to move around if needed.
2. Cut the sucker away as it takes energy away from the plant ( my sucker was flowering)
3. Spay the plant 1-2 times a week in the evening to reduce white flies infestation.
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#50 User is offline   Robert1943 

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Posted 02 February 2015 - 11:33 AM

View PostGraceS, on 02 February 2015 - 10:29 AM, said:

Yesterday morning, I was happily looking at my tallest tomato plant. The largest tomato is now 5mm and 2 bunches of fruits were developing. There are also 2 sets of flowers developing and I was looking forward to 4 sets of tomatoes. The day was very sunny and extremely windy. I took another look before noon and to my dismay the top of the plant and most of the leaves have gone limp. I suspected the weather as the water level is fine. The plant did not recover even after I have moved it indoors. Yesterday night, I steeled my heart to chop off the top together with a set of flowers and snipped off some limped and dried leaves. This morning, some flowers and fruits have dropped off. It is in ICU now and looks like it may not make it. Boohoohoo....my consolation is that I have afew more plants at the flowering and fruiting stage.

Lessons learnt:
1. It would be better to top the cherry tomato plant to stop it from growing so tall and promote flowering at lower height. The flowering stage would only be slightly delayed but you get a stronger stem that need only be supported at taller heights. It would also be easier to move around if needed.
2. Cut the sucker away as it takes energy away from the plant ( my sucker was flowering)
3. Spay the plant 1-2 times a week in the evening to reduce white flies infestation.


Whenever I see my plants going limp I think of four reasons
1 insufficient water
2 Nutrients either too strong or too weak
3 Root rot
4 PH incorrect as on a hot day the PH can sky rocket and impact on the plant

PS I never chop the top off any of my plants as this also impacts on the plant and causes stress.
If I was ill and someone chopped off my arm this would cause a decline in my health.
PSps sorry for this analogy nothing personal.
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#51 User is offline   GraceS 

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Posted 03 February 2015 - 12:58 PM

Hi Robert
Ruled out 1-3. If it is the hot weather affecting the PH, would adjusting the PH down address the issue? Bringng the plant indoor where it is cooler and shaded from the sun did not bring the leaves which has gone limped back to life. The plant is too tall and it will hit the roof in no time so I have made the hard decision to top the final 30cm. The plant seems to have survived the "surgery" but would need furher monitoring. Thanks for your advice so I will know what to do should it happen again.
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#52 User is offline   Robert1943 

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Posted 03 February 2015 - 06:07 PM

Hi GraceS the ph in tropical weather can escalate in one day.
My friend in Bangkok says with the heat ph can go right off the scale.
The ph for tomato should be in the region of 6.2 to 6.5.
I have found that root rot has happened this year with some if my plants so I have added h202 hydrogen peroxide which has saved many of my plants.
Check to see if the roots are white or brownish.
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#53 User is offline   GraceS 

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Posted 03 February 2015 - 09:07 PM

The roots in the nutrient are white. The air roots are yellowish ocre. The leaves are dropping one after another.....I think it cannot make it. How often do we have to check PH for growing tomatoes? They seem to be highly sensitive and can fail suddenly.
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#54 User is offline   Robert1943 

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 09:05 AM

View PostGraceS, on 03 February 2015 - 09:07 PM, said:

The roots in the nutrient are white. The air roots are yellowish ocre. The leaves are dropping one after another.....I think it cannot make it. How often do we have to check PH for growing tomatoes? They seem to be highly sensitive and can fail suddenly.


Alas I do not have any more advice, see if a local forum member can have a look and give their views.
One last comment, see if the nutrients are getting very hot.

This post has been edited by Robert1943: 04 February 2015 - 09:06 AM

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#55 User is offline   sthh 

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 09:13 AM

Maybe you can take a photo? Did you change your nutrient solution recently? While moving the tomato in and outdoor, did any of the main stem bend? Any insect that you saw on that plant recently?
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#56 User is offline   elsiekoh 

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 11:36 PM

Might be the noon sun??? Too hot?? But it shd recover fast once u bring it in... hmmm...
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#57 User is offline   GraceS 

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Posted 14 February 2015 - 03:21 AM

My cherry tomato plant survived the rescue mission to move it to the kitchen to save it from dying under the hot sun. As it was very tall and almost hit the roof indoors, I lost most of the flower blooms and leaves due to the weather and move. Quite happy that 3 fruits continued to grow despite the plant losing more than 2/3 of the leaves and being topped.
http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e308/graces10/TomatoFruit_20150211-2_zps164493ab.jpg

Picture of Sweet Petite Chilli taken 10 days ago, 2 days shy of 2 month old. Flower buds are already forming. Will post a picture when it flowers. Sthh, thanks for the seeds and I hope it will bear yummy fruits like yours.
http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e308/graces10/SweetPeptiteChilli_20150204_zpsf667a278.jpg

Genovese basil 4 days shy of 2 months old. I am only giving it a weak solution up to now. Furret, thanks for the seeds.
http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e308/graces10/GenoveseBasil_20150204_zpsd32c7e00.jpg

The African Leaf plant is still growing very well after 111 days despite being given only tap or rain water. It has a large root system and I am surprised that it lasted so long in a simple kratky setup. I am waiting for a large CNY container to continue the experiment as it has long outgrown the original setup. Held back cutting the stems to encourage more growth as the container could no longer bear the weight of the plant. Following this experience, I am growing a mulberry cutting in hydroponics and hope that it can bear fruit.
http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e308/graces10/AfricaLeafPlant_20150205_zps753f49e7.jpg
P
Hydroponics help me to bring the plants indoor and closer for my 95 year old mum to enjoy. Gave my mum a money plant and coleus grown in hydroponics and she is very pleased. Thanks to sweetpea for the beautiful coleus.
http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e308/graces10/MoneyPlant_20150204_zps17b32f1e.jpg
http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e308/graces10/Coleus-Hydroponics_20150204-1_zps987d630e.jpg

Cut down the Malabar spinach plants again after the last big harvest one and a half months ago. Using the stems to grow more new plants hydroponically.

This is the eighth time that sunbirds are building a nest at my Christmas tree. The beautiful male sunbird flew into my house and was released after taking a photo.
http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e308/graces10/SAM_0651_zps459993be.jpg
http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e308/graces10/2015-02-13153220_zpsa0f9c952.jpg

Another pair of puku birds spending a lazy afternoon at my garden. Like the sparrows and starlings, they are frequent visitors.
http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e308/graces10/PukuPairIntimateMoments_zpse0a47114.jpg

http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e308/graces10/PukuBirdSunTanning-3_zps2a4ef555.jpg

Happy Valentine's day to all!
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#58 User is offline   sthh 

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Posted 14 February 2015 - 08:34 AM

Ho Ho Ho, tomato fruit!! It will be satisfying to eat it. And the sweet petite pepper is looking good too! These pepper bear fruits very easily, so I am sure you will have a good harvest. Actually, I think they bear more fruits than tomatoes, and ripen faster too. So many interesting birds in your garden

This post has been edited by sthh: 14 February 2015 - 08:35 AM

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#59 User is offline   Robert1943 

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Posted 14 February 2015 - 12:31 PM

View PostGraceS, on 14 February 2015 - 03:21 AM, said:

My cherry tomato plant survived the rescue mission to move it to the kitchen to save it from dying under the hot sun. As it was very tall and almost hit the roof indoors, I lost most of the flower blooms and leaves due to the weather and move. Quite happy that 3 fruits continued to grow despite the plant losing more than 2/3 of the leaves and being topped.
http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e308/graces10/TomatoFruit_20150211-2_zps164493ab.jpg

Picture of Sweet Petite Chilli taken 10 days ago, 2 days shy of 2 month old. Flower buds are already forming. Will post a picture when it flowers. Sthh, thanks for the seeds and I hope it will bear yummy fruits like yours.
http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e308/graces10/SweetPeptiteChilli_20150204_zpsf667a278.jpg

Genovese basil 4 days shy of 2 months old. I am only giving it a weak solution up to now. Furret, thanks for the seeds.
http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e308/graces10/GenoveseBasil_20150204_zpsd32c7e00.jpg

The African Leaf plant is still growing very well after 111 days despite being given only tap or rain water. It has a large root system and I am surprised that it lasted so long in a simple kratky setup. I am waiting for a large CNY container to continue the experiment as it has long outgrown the original setup. Held back cutting the stems to encourage more growth as the container could no longer bear the weight of the plant. Following this experience, I am growing a mulberry cutting in hydroponics and hope that it can bear fruit.
http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e308/graces10/AfricaLeafPlant_20150205_zps753f49e7.jpg
P
Hydroponics help me to bring the plants indoor and closer for my 95 year old mum to enjoy. Gave my mum a money plant and coleus grown in hydroponics and she is very pleased. Thanks to sweetpea for the beautiful coleus.
http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e308/graces10/MoneyPlant_20150204_zps17b32f1e.jpg
http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e308/graces10/Coleus-Hydroponics_20150204-1_zps987d630e.jpg

Cut down the Malabar spinach plants again after the last big harvest one and a half months ago. Using the stems to grow more new plants hydroponically.

This is the eighth time that sunbirds are building a nest at my Christmas tree. The beautiful male sunbird flew into my house and was released after taking a photo.
http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e308/graces10/SAM_0651_zps459993be.jpg
http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e308/graces10/2015-02-13153220_zpsa0f9c952.jpg

Another pair of puku birds spending a lazy afternoon at my garden. Like the sparrows and starlings, they are frequent visitors.
http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e308/graces10/PukuPairIntimateMoments_zpse0a47114.jpg

http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e308/graces10/PukuBirdSunTanning-3_zps2a4ef555.jpg

Happy Valentine's day to all!


I just love this article!
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#60 User is offline   GraceS 

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Posted 18 February 2015 - 11:18 PM

The largest sweet petite chilli plant has flowered today. A few more buds are probably going to flower soon.The weather was so hot over the last few days that 4 of the sweet petite chilli young plants got burnt and shed most of its large leaves. Hope they will survive.

Wishing all a happy and healthy Chinese New Year. Huat ah!
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