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Growing Arrowhead for the Chinese New Year

#1 User is offline   wilson 

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Posted 06 January 2005 - 12:53 PM

Hi,

Chinese New Year is around the corner - about a month more.

The arrowhead croms have arrived in the wet markets here.

Have anyone of you starting growing them?

It seems that they do not last, prone to neck rot that causes the whole plant to collapse.

Anyone tried to plant them in mud?
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#2 User is offline   orchideenjaeger 

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Posted 06 January 2005 - 01:25 PM

Actually, my only use for 'duck potatoes' is for eatin' not plantin'.....
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#3 User is offline   boonboon 

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Posted 07 January 2005 - 10:16 AM

wilson wrote:

Quote

Hi,  

Chinese New Year is around the corner - about a month more.  

The arrowhead croms have arrived in the wet markets here.  

Have anyone of you starting growing them?  

It seems that they do not last, prone to neck rot that causes the whole plant to collapse.  

Anyone tried to plant them in mud?



Usu I will start growing them 1 month before CNY. Been growing them every year since I was young but throw them away after they start to droop due to insufficient support from the pebbles and the corm is also rotting. My grandmother had once tried to keep it after CNY and was rewarded with flowers and even small corms. The elderly was very happy and treated it as a good omen since my grandma has wanted a grandson so badly.

Wilson, don't you find that the shape of the corm resembles the male reproductive organ? Oops! Sorry ladies for being so crude in the early morning. Since Wilson has touched on this subject and I might as well elaborated a bit further on some Chinese traditions.
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#4 User is offline   boonboon 

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Posted 07 January 2005 - 10:18 AM

orchideenjaeger said:

Actually, my only use for 'duck potatoes'  is for eatin' not plantin'.....


Yes, they taste better than potato chips but it is nightmare having to slice them and fried them over a small fire since they burn very easily. Has anyone tried them?
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#5 User is offline   wilson 

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Posted 07 January 2005 - 01:02 PM

boonboon said:

Wilson, don't you find that the shape of the corm resembles the male reproductive organ? Oops! Sorry ladies for being so crude in the early morning. Since Wilson has touched on this subject and I might as well elaborated a bit further on some Chinese traditions.


Oh yes, I learnt abt this Chinese tradition while watching a MediaCorp Channel 8 sit-com. As the growing point of the arrowhead crom is so prominent and suggestive of the male reproductive organ, it is not surprising that the older Chinese folk believe that this crom when eaten will ensure the birth of a son.

Have anyone of you succesfully grown this plant for a long time? It appears that the rotting of the croms always appears? Any way to eliminate it?

Boonboon - U growing any this year?
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#6 User is offline   boonboon 

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Posted 07 January 2005 - 02:17 PM

[quote="wilson"][quote=boonboon]
Have anyone of you succesfully grown this plant for a long time? It appears that the rotting of the croms always appears? Any way to eliminate it?

Boonboon - U growing any this year?[/quote]

Rotting of the corm is a natural process after providing food to the plant before the establishment of strong healthy roots. Usually I will throw the plant away after CNY. Have not tried to keep it since might need to pot them in some soil medium just like other water plants in the long term. A bit troublesome leh.

Yup. Will be growing this year.
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#7 User is offline   wilson 

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Posted 07 January 2005 - 02:31 PM

Interestingly, the rot appears to spread to the growing point that causes the plant to collapse is what I noticed.

U experienced anything similar?

Do post your pics...!
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#8 User is offline   boonboon 

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Posted 07 January 2005 - 04:57 PM

wilson said:

Interestingly, the rot appears to spread to the growing point that causes the plant to collapse is what I noticed.

U experienced anything similar?

Do post your pics...!


The growing point is still solid if I remembered correctly. Jus that it needs some support when the corm starts to rot. Wonder will growing it deeper helps or not...
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Posted 07 January 2005 - 08:36 PM

its a very simple to grow plant..
just make sure it gets water and enough light..
mine grew so much last year that i had to keep trimming them..
in the end..
i fed them to my fishes..
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#10 User is offline   boonboon 

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Posted 08 January 2005 - 11:26 PM

This pic was taken in Feb 2003.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v330/boonboon0406/Chinese%20New%20Year/CNY2003Arrowhead03.jpg
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#11 User is offline   HortVet 

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Posted 09 January 2005 - 10:07 PM

a little side track here- but the chips are lovely. Better than potato, but my fav is still tapioca chips! Yummo!!!!!!!!!!!
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Posted 18 January 2005 - 06:47 PM

is it possible to establish this plant here in Sg's tropical climate in the long run?
or they need the seasons?
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