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Air pruning porous ceramic pot vs non-porous plastic pot

#1 User is offline   yiid 

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 03:37 AM

Just curious, according to this website http://depts.washing...uning.htm#_edn2,

"Air pruning happens naturally when roots are exposed to air in the absence of high humidity. The roots are effectively “burned” off, causing the plant to constantly produce new and healthy branching roots. If roots are not exposed to air, they continue to grow around the container in a constricted pattern. The roots may spiral, twist, kink or become strangled. When the plant is later installed it will likely fail to establish a normal root structure, and instead will have reduced uptake of water and nutrients. Eventually abnormal growth should be obvious and could cause the plant to fail. Damaged root systems also cause leaves to turn yellow or brown, shrivel or drop. Healthy, highly branched root structures allow a plant to more efficiently uptake water and nutrients while increasing growth and overall plant health. A strong root system will make a plant better able to establish itself when installed in a restoration project."

So does it mean that air-pruning is good in general for plants cos it encourages a healthy root system? So even if I don't intend to transplant the plant, air-pruning would still be beneficial right?

So does it mean that porous ceramic pots are better than plastic pots?
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#2 User is offline   islaverde 

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 07:59 AM

yep. porous ceramic or terracotta nonglazed pots are definitely better as they are cooler due to the constant water evaporisation.. but they are heavy thats the drawback.
there are also rootpruning bags that nurseries in the USA use...
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#3 User is offline   Betta Fantasy 

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 09:16 AM

really meh? then tha ction of transferring pot bound rooted plants with its rootball into a larger sized pot will be the wrong act! hehe
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#4 User is offline   islaverde 

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 09:57 AM

View PostBetta Fantasy, on 25 July 2011 - 09:16 AM, said:

really meh? then tha ction of transferring pot bound rooted plants with its rootball into a larger sized pot will be the wrong act! hehe




no, transferring to larger pot is simply to let the plant get more root space to grow bigger.

root pruning on the other hand - the idea is to prune or cut the roots, not by physical means but by exposure to air so that the roots will not circle around the pot (in a rootbound situation) and starve the plant. Instead the pruned roots will BRANCH, that is the idea to create many branched fine root hairs instead of aggressive feeder roots.
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#5 User is offline   islaverde 

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 09:59 AM

Below is an example of a specialised pot used for "air pruning" roots.

When the roots contact air, they stop growing and then branch sideways.. leading in time to a nice root ball.


http://www.millhouse...age/air_pot.JPG
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#6 User is offline   islaverde 

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 10:03 AM

View Postyiid, on 25 July 2011 - 03:37 AM, said:


So does it mean that air-pruning is good in general for plants cos it encourages a healthy root system? So even if I don't intend to transplant the plant, air-pruning would still be beneficial right?





In general, potted plants are better off with fine branched roots intead of encircling roots.

If you dont want to move up to a larger container, you either take the plant out and cut/trim off the encircling roots (so that root branching will occur) or buy specialised pots I have mentioned below..
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#7 User is offline   Betta Fantasy 

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 11:18 AM

I guess root pruning is good then, as with top branch pruning.
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#8 User is offline   mm 

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 01:52 PM

Was quite interested in this at one time. Found this company, but they did only "commercial" level sales - i.e. min order UK1000 sterling. Then in the last Gardentech, there was a company that was selling something similar, but produced in Malaysia. I don't know if they were selling in retail volumes, as I didn't bother to find out - because by then, reasonable doubt had crept in as to whether I really needed it, or whether I was just seduced by gadgetry ... and with an alarming demonstration of fortitude, I let the buying opportunity pass. (I frighten myself sometimes :)/>

This post has been edited by mm: 25 July 2011 - 01:53 PM

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#9 User is offline   Mandy22 

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 05:14 PM

Hi, i like this forum and all the information shared hare. It helps me to clear my doubts.


Thanks
Pruning

This post has been edited by Mandy22: 31 May 2012 - 05:14 PM

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#10 User is offline   shirleycox 

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 03:05 PM

Smart Pots are manufactured out of a custom, non-woven, polypropylene material. Roots grown in a Smart Pot come in contact with the fuzzy, fabric inner wall of the bag and penetrate or grow into the fabric. The bag's tough fabric prevents the root's continued longitudinal growth, in effect pruning it, causing the root to develop masses of lateral fibrous roots. Upon comparison, root systems that developed in a Smart Pot have a much greater mass or volume then those found in hard-sided containers. Plants grown in Smart Pots have root balls that contain many more roots then found in a hard-sided container of similar size. The fibrous root systems produced in Smart Pots are more efficient and enable plants to maximize water and hydroponic nutrients uptake in the limited surrounding soil mass.
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