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Awesome Tropical Cordyceps Vodoo and zombies

#1 User is offline   Or Or 

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 01:49 PM

Cordyceps are truly amazing parasites. They take over the brain of the host and manoevre them to a higher ground in order to spread their spores before killing the hosts.

There are 400 plus known species and many are found around here.

This one is Ophiocordyceps dipterigena (aff) infect only flies - I think I posted a pic here before. The fly was made to rest on a high Calamus and spread its wings and legs to make way for the fruiting bodies to stick out like needles on a vodoo doll. Found this in Singapore.
http://i272.photobucket.com/albums/jj181/oror88/cordyceps.jpg

This second one O. unilateralis (aff) attack only ants. It pyscho the giant forest ant to climb up a lallang and bit onto the leaf to secure itself before killing it.
http://i272.photobucket.com/albums/jj181/oror88/critters/cordyceps2sk.jpg

Also search for the BBC clips on youtube about this subject - rather atmospheric piece too.

Cheers.
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#2 User is offline   islaverde 

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 02:05 PM

gross! like invasion of the body snatchers.
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#3 User is offline   shawnchen 

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 05:06 PM

Nice!! I didn't know they existed in singapore also... My classmates and I were just talking about mind controlling parasites just now!!
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#4 User is offline   dinosaurr 

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 09:41 PM

View Postislaverde, on 09 February 2011 - 02:05 PM, said:

gross! like invasion of the body snatchers.


O_o ... totally agree with u! :blink:/> :blink:/>
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#5 User is offline   8qpz 

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 10:21 PM

It's amazing how the fungi manages to control the host to make it move to higher ground. Good thing this only invades insects.....
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#6 User is offline   ArborVitae 

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Posted 10 February 2011 - 12:51 AM

View Post8qpz, on 09 February 2011 - 10:21 PM, said:

It's amazing how the fungi manages to control the host to make it move to higher ground. Good thing this only invades insects.....


could these fungi evolute into some new variants that infect higher mammals...? a good scifi horror movie huh
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#7 User is offline   Or Or 

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Posted 10 February 2011 - 10:11 AM

There is more to this - researchers found dead ants always face northwest, about 25 cm from the ground at sites with at least 90% humidity. Strangely, if the ant is allowed to die in its nest, the survival rate of the fungus is zero. The fungus also protects its turf by growing into the cracks and niches of the exoskeleton to reinforce it, preventing entry of other microbes to compete for its food and fortress.
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#8 User is offline   Or Or 

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Posted 11 February 2011 - 01:48 PM

View PostArborVitae, on 10 February 2011 - 02:20 PM, said:

encephalitis? maybe these fungi infect the frontal lobes of the human brain, causing disinhibition.

My understanding is that it has an alkaloid that mimics dopamine action.
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#9 User is offline   digitalgate 

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Posted 12 February 2011 - 11:00 PM

View PostOr Or, on 09 February 2011 - 01:49 PM, said:

Cordyceps are truly amazing parasites. They take over the brain of the host and manoevre them to a higher ground in order to spread their spores before killing the hosts.


Also search for the BBC clips on youtube about this subject - rather atmospheric piece too.

Cheers.

found this in which forest?
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#10 User is offline   Or Or 

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Posted 14 February 2011 - 11:13 AM

Upper pierce and Johore.
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#11 User is offline   ufc18567 

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 04:22 PM

The information is very interesting. I just saw it the first time. Thanks for sharing this.
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#12 User is offline   Phantom 

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Posted 30 March 2012 - 09:59 PM

nice
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#13 User is offline   Calvinlim 

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 11:10 PM

I am wondering if we can eat these like we eat the cordyceps in chinese medicine. I am a little terrified of doing so now seeing how these things can take over your mind and eat you from inside :P/>
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#14 User is offline   marvinuncleherbs 

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Posted 27 March 2015 - 11:22 AM

Actually other cordyceps species grow all over the world, mainly in Asia in humid tropical forests.
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