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Gingers to recommend, anyone?

#1 User is offline   tlh72 

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 02:57 PM

Hello,
I have a wooden decked area between two tall walls that i'd like to place some plants. It's quite windy but mainly in the shade for most part of the day. It also gets very wet when it rains as it gets some run-off from the roof. So far the only plant that has survived reasonably is a pot of costus woodsonii i placed there. Heliconia didn't do well as it was too dark. Cordylline got a serious case of scales.

Was wondering if there are other gingers that can grow in this kind of condition, preferably with flowers, and low leaf fall rate, if that makes sense, ie want to avoid having to always sweep up dead leaves off the deck.
Any recommendation of plants and where to get them would be greatly appreciated. Don't need anything too exotic as am relatively new to this and still killing more plants than i would prefer. Then I can go shopping with a target in mind.

I apologise for this newbie question and would be happy to be directed to relavant threads.

Thank you in advance.

LH
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#2 User is offline   pebble 

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 11:28 PM

Alpinia purpurata is a good choice. You can also get the variegated leaf version (alpinia zerumbet, Alpinia vittata. They are v nice.
How about Calathea Lutea or the Thaumatococcus Danielli.

Or the Calathes family (Calathea warscewiczii, calathea zebrina, Calathea loeseneri, Calathea majestica albolineata

Alocasia is also nice. Or the swiss cheese plant (monstera deliciosa), philodendron, aglaonema.

Some palms are also ok. like Rhapis excelsa

Any nursery should have these, like FEF or WF.
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#3 User is offline   elwingo 

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 11:36 AM

View Postpebble, on 30 July 2010 - 11:28 PM, said:

Alpinia purpurata is a good choice. You can also get the variegated leaf version (alpinia zerumbet, Alpinia vittata. They are v nice.
How about Calathea Lutea or the Thaumatococcus Danielli.

Or the Calathes family (Calathea warscewiczii, calathea zebrina, Calathea loeseneri, Calathea majestica albolineata

Alocasia is also nice. Or the swiss cheese plant (monstera deliciosa), philodendron, aglaonema.

Some palms are also ok. like Rhapis excelsa

Any nursery should have these, like FEF or WF.


i have calathea lutea and thaumatococcus too. c.lutea has fantastic BIG leaves but it needs to be planted in the ground i'm afraid. my t. danielli are planted in pots and serve to block off the neighbours but their purple flowers are v insignificant so if u are looking for the typical showy ginger flowers this is perhaps not suitable. but if u like green lush leaves this would be a good choice.

i love alocasias too. they have the most interesting leaves..
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#4 User is offline   tlh72 

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 08:30 PM

So, armed with a shopping list, I went shopping at one of the cck nurseries over the national day weekend and came back with these.

Beginnings of a ginger row.

http://i1025.photobucket.com/albums/y315/tlhsg/garden/gingerrow.jpg

New gingers are the first 4 plants: purple and pink alpinia pupurata, peacock plant and calathea loeseneri
Should look better when the flowers come.

Unfortunately, hubby wants the plants moved. He's worried about water/soil rotting the timber deck. ^grumble^

Thanks again for all the helpful and educational suggestions!

LH
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#5 User is offline   islaverde 

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 08:39 PM

thats the problem with timber decking. you tell yourself you got to be careful with the watering...etc.
then that would probably eliminate these tropical plants like gingers and heliconias as they need copious amount of watering and they need a humid environment and moist soil with lots of room for roots to expand. Alpinia purpurata will never look good in a pot.
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#6 User is offline   tlh72 

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 08:59 PM

View Postislaverde, on 10 August 2010 - 08:39 PM, said:

thats the problem with timber decking. you tell yourself you got to be careful with the watering...etc.
then that would probably eliminate these tropical plants like gingers and heliconias as they need copious amount of watering and they need a humid environment and moist soil with lots of room for roots to expand. Alpinia purpurata will never look good in a pot.


Hi islaverde,
It so happens that area gets wet when it rains cos it's not covered and in fact gets really wet cos it gets runoff from the roof and the awning anyway. So i thought of gingers as i needed plants that could withstand all the water.

That said, i will bear in mind the problem of growing these in pots. I thought no harm trying and if the plants didn't do well, will find them a spot in the garden. :)/>
And then maybe try shade tolerant orchids potted in very very open media. :)/>

LH
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#7 User is offline   islaverde 

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 09:04 PM

You can however try a huge potted Calathea lutea. This will be a nice specimen and you can ilumminate the undersides of its glaucous (white waxy) leaves with garden lights at night.

http://www.junglesee...lathealutea.jpg
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#8 User is offline   tlh72 

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Posted 11 August 2010 - 05:50 PM

View Postislaverde, on 10 August 2010 - 09:04 PM, said:

You can however try a huge potted Calathea lutea. This will be a nice specimen and you can ilumminate the undersides of its glaucous (white waxy) leaves with garden lights at night.

http://www.junglesee...lathealutea.jpg


I've learnt a new word today - glaucous. :)/>

Actually, I have C lutea growing in the garden, planted by the landscape contractor 2 years ago. I was happy to see it growing with abandon, until I noticed the grass in the shade of the leaves dying. Now have to tie them up and be more ruthless with my trimming. I'm not sure sure if i'm doing that right though. With heliconia type supposed to cut back to ground when flowers fade, but with C lutea, new flowers just keep appearing. And I find it a pity to cut those flowering ones as those have the biggest leaves. So only cut when new off-shoot starting to grow below.
http://i1025.photobucket.com/albums/y315/tlhsg/garden/P1010217.jpg

View from second floor landing
http://i1025.photobucket.com/albums/y315/tlhsg/garden/cluteaabove2.jpg

Candlelabra of flowers, actually from 2 plants
http://i1025.photobucket.com/albums/y315/tlhsg/garden/P1010219.jpg


I had never thought they might be ok in a pot as they seem so big. But I may just dig up some out of zone babies and pot them and see. They do seem to prefer more sun though (those grown in the shaded part of garden are more slow growing).

http://i1025.photobucket.com/albums/y315/tlhsg/garden/P1010220.jpg
Thanks for the suggestion!

LH
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#9 User is offline   islaverde 

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Posted 11 August 2010 - 09:41 PM

LH,
one thing that I personally dislike about the landscaping style one sees these days here is to plant rows upon rows of the same plant especially large tropical plants like Heliconias (except psittacorums) and Calathea luteas. The overall effect makes it look like some banana plantation of sort. I've seen a house with rows of torch ginger (apparently trying to hide a wall). So from the outside, it looks so weird.

Large tropical plants like C lutea, pendent heliconias look best when they are the central of attraction as the specimen plant of your garden. Hence, they should be planted in clumps; surrounded by smaller ground covers or shrubs.

Yes, you can be ruthless when it comes to maintenance for these rhizomatous plants. It is said that it is difficult to "kill" them once they are well established. So cut down those C lutea stems that are weak, done with flowering, just don't look nice...etc. You want to retain only those stems that are strong plus those new shoots.

And do top dress the soil with lots of compost.
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#10 User is offline   islaverde 

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Posted 11 August 2010 - 09:45 PM

And one more thing that might be of interest... C lutea when planted in the sun do get more pronounced white waxy coating as compared to those grown in the shade. Again, there are a few "varieties" of lutea and some do get more wax and some don't. depends on what you like.

C lutea leaves are used in tropical latin america for wrapping food.
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#11 User is offline   tlh72 

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Posted 11 August 2010 - 10:20 PM

View Postislaverde, on 11 August 2010 - 09:45 PM, said:

And one more thing that might be of interest... C lutea when planted in the sun do get more pronounced white waxy coating as compared to those grown in the shade. Again, there are a few "varieties" of lutea and some do get more wax and some don't. depends on what you like.

C lutea leaves are used in tropical latin america for wrapping food.


At least they aren't poisonous then! Can use them to wrap my next bbq sting ray?

Thanks. I wasn't paying much attention to the garden when we had it done. Our brief to the contractor was sun tolerant hardy plants that would survive with minimal maintenance (haha), nothing sharp (for feng shui). Truth be told, though he did send us an full list with pictures of the plants, I didn't know much about the plants. Only thing I veto was the frangipani. Beautiful as it is, we're rather superstitious.

Personally, I also don't have an eye for aesthetics. It probably is a pity the gingers I have along the wall don't get to show off their full glory, but they are surviving and providing some degree of privacy from my neighbour, so I'm quite happy to leave them there. Also, most of the time, I see them through the windows, so they get showcased as individual z"clumps" in that way.

Anyway, gardens evolve, so who knows what will be there next year? :)/> Probably the gingers! The heliconia I tried to get rid off still pop up here and there.



LH

This post has been edited by tlh72: 11 August 2010 - 10:20 PM

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#12 User is offline   elwingo 

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Posted 12 August 2010 - 12:48 PM

View Posttlh72, on 11 August 2010 - 05:50 PM, said:



Candlelabra of flowers, actually from 2 plants
http://i1025.photobucket.com/albums/y315/tlhsg/garden/P1010219.jpg




a candlelabra of flowers! what a nice description.
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#13 User is offline   tlh72 

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Posted 12 August 2010 - 02:16 PM

View Postelwingo, on 12 August 2010 - 12:48 PM, said:

a candlelabra of flowers! what a nice description.


Thanks. Am no linguist.
Candlelabras remind me of Liberace. Oh dear, showing my age. :P/>

LH
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#14 User is offline   CCT 

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Posted 20 March 2011 - 09:05 PM

View Posttlh72, on 10 August 2010 - 08:30 PM, said:

So, armed with a shopping list, I went shopping at one of the cck nurseries over the national day weekend and came back with these.

Beginnings of a ginger row.

http://i1025.photobucket.com/albums/y315/tlhsg/garden/gingerrow.jpg

New gingers are the first 4 plants: purple and pink alpinia pupurata, peacock plant and calathea loeseneri
Should look better when the flowers come.

Unfortunately, hubby wants the plants moved. He's worried about water/soil rotting the timber deck. ^grumble^

Thanks again for all the helpful and educational suggestions!

LH


LH,

Was reading the various threads here to learn more. I like your stone wall. Very nice.

Cheers!
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#15 User is offline   tlh72 

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Posted 20 March 2011 - 09:43 PM

View PostCCT, on 20 March 2011 - 09:05 PM, said:

LH,

Was reading the various threads here to learn more. I like your stone wall. Very nice.

Cheers!


Hi Chuan,
Thanks for dropping by. Wall was my husband's choice. Unfortunately colour faded somewhat after I washed it with water jet.

LH
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#16 User is offline   lifecellskin 

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  Posted 09 May 2011 - 09:10 PM

View Posttlh72, on 11 August 2010 - 05:50 PM, said:

I've learnt a new word today - glaucous. :)/>

Actually, I have C lutea growing in the garden, planted by the landscape contractor 2 years ago. I was happy to see it growing with abandon, until I noticed the grass in the shade of the leaves dying. Now have to tie them up and be more ruthless with my trimming. I'm not sure sure if i'm doing that right though. With heliconia type supposed to cut back to ground when flowers fade, but with C lutea, new flowers just keep appearing. And I find it a pity to cut those flowering ones as those have the biggest leaves. So only cut when new off-shoot starting to grow below.
http://i1025.photobucket.com/albums/y315/tlhsg/garden/P1010217.jpg

View from second floor landing
http://i1025.photobucket.com/albums/y315/tlhsg/garden/cluteaabove2.jpg

Candlelabra of flowers, actually from 2 plants
http://i1025.photobucket.com/albums/y315/tlhsg/garden/P1010219.jpg


I had never thought they might be ok in a pot as they seem so big. But I may just dig up some out of zone babies and pot them and see. They do seem to prefer more sun though (those grown in the shaded part of garden are more slow growing).

http://i1025.photobucket.com/albums/y315/tlhsg/garden/P1010220.jpg
Thanks for the suggestion!

LH




Wow!! its great I like it.....
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#17 User is offline   tlh72 

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 07:31 AM

View Postlifecellskin, on 09 May 2011 - 09:10 PM, said:

Wow!! its great I like it.....

Hi Lifecellskin,
Welcome to GCS!
Thanks for dropping by and thank you for your kind comments.
The plants are not as lush now as I had to trim them aggressively to allow my new turf to establish. I hope they will grow back soon.

LH
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#18 User is offline   tlh72 

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 04:33 PM

Update 18 months on.
The alpinias all died. So did a curcuma.
Also read from book to group plants in clumps of 3 or 5. Not sure if it looks better.

http://i1025.photobucket.com/albums/y315/tlhsg/garden/012-12.jpg


I got this recently as I liked the almost pixellated form of variegation. However, new offshoots have been totally green. Can anyone tell me how to get the variegation back? More sun? Or have I been sold 2 types of plants in 1 pot :hitmyself:/>

http://i1025.photobucket.com/albums/y315/tlhsg/garden/011-9.jpg

Thanks in advance

LH
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