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Propagation Aquarium Plant

#1 User is offline   voidzsg 

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Posted 14 April 2009 - 12:23 AM

Hi GCS members,

could anyone advice how to propagate a aquarium plant step by step?
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#2 User is offline   Herb Lover 

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Posted 14 April 2009 - 01:38 AM

View Postvoidzsg, on Apr 14 2009, 12:23 AM, said:

Hi GCS members,

could anyone advice how to propagate a aquarium plant step by step?



How to advise you when you've yet to indicate what kind of aquarium plant you want to propagate? Need to be specific lah. :)/>

HL
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#3 User is offline   Grandiflora 

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Posted 14 April 2009 - 08:21 AM

View PostHerb Lover, on Apr 14 2009, 01:38 AM, said:

How to advise you when you've yet to indicate what kind of aquarium plant you want to propagate? Need to be specific lah. :)/>

HL



Totally agree with HL. Having said that, most aquarium plants (especially the common ones) can be propagated by cutting one part or other off.

Many stem plants (hygrophilas, elodeas, cabombas/ambulias, rotalas etc) can be cut into sections and planted (each section would form its own roots and grow). If left long enough stem plants often produce roots by themselves into the water column.

Rhizomatous aquarium plants (most commonly java fern - microsorium -, bolbitis and anubias species) can have their rhizomes divided when they are large enough. New buds would grow from the rhizome.

Spreading plants like Vallisneria and eleocharis can be divided when the baby plantlets have become big enough. Similarly, lotuses and other nymphaeas produce baby bulbs next to parent bulbs and these can be removed for planting elsewhere.

Hope this helps. Some other plants require different techniques. What plants have you got that need dividing? I just divided my anubias and bolbitis and now have too many of them!
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#4 User is offline   voidzsg 

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Posted 14 April 2009 - 10:22 AM

Oops :hitmyself:/>

i am sorry. it is true what you guys said.

well, the aquatic plant i refer to is called Bacopa Carolina.

http://i581.photobucket.com/albums/ss252/rstoh/BACOPACAROLINIANA2.jpg

please advice
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#5 User is offline   mab 

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Posted 14 April 2009 - 11:46 AM

This is a stem plant. As what Grandiflora said, you can cut the long stem into section/s and plant it back into the substrate. Current stem will grow side shoots and will look bushier. For aquascape normally you prune it in a slope (shorter front) so that it will look nice when it regrow.

Cheers
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#6 User is offline   Grandiflora 

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Posted 15 April 2009 - 08:54 AM

Yup, agree with mab. Just basically cut and shove into gravel. The old plant will bud off and regrow and the new one will just continue growing and put out roots. This plant can also be used as a pond plant as it grows quite nicely with its feet in water.
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#7 User is offline   voidzsg 

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Posted 15 April 2009 - 09:13 AM

wow...thanks for all the advice. :notworthy:/> :notworthy:/>

you guys make it sound easy to do. i will try it.

but how do we blind the bunch of stems together like those that sold in the aquarium shops?
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#8 User is offline   Grandiflora 

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Posted 15 April 2009 - 09:22 AM

View Postvoidzsg, on Apr 15 2009, 09:13 AM, said:

wow...thanks for all the advice. :notworthy:/> :notworthy:/>

you guys make it sound easy to do. i will try it.

but how do we blind the bunch of stems together like those that sold in the aquarium shops?


Shops tend to sell their plants bunched together with a pad of rock wool and a steel ring as a weight. Although this looks great short-term, in the long run, youre better off planting them seperately (if you want them to look bushy, plant close together but individually) as the plant stems are often crushed by the steel ring etc.

Hope this helps
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#9 User is offline   LawrenceLee 

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Posted 24 April 2009 - 05:24 PM

View Postvoidzsg, on Apr 14 2009, 10:22 AM, said:

Oops :hitmyself:/>

i am sorry. it is true what you guys said.

well, the aquatic plant i refer to is called Bacopa Carolina.

http://i581.photobucket.com/albums/ss252/rstoh/BACOPACAROLINIANA2.jpg

please advice


B. caroliniana is one of the slower growing stem plants. If you are not injecting CO2, it may be slow to propagate a big bunch. A faster way is to grow them emersed.

Just stick stem cuttings in soggy soil/peat/gravel and cover with a plastic cling wrap. Ensure leaves never dry out as you are planting them, if necessary, mist when planting. Grow in cool place with reflected sunlight, never direct sun. Every couple of days, open the clingwrap for a few minutes to refresh the air.

You will find the new leaves change shape. When emersed growth are 2 inch long, you can choose to progressively harden them to air for faster growth, or you can continue as it is. In no time you will have a bunch of plants growing for you to transplant. Always ensure the substrate is flooded.

If you had hardened them, the plants will take a time to convert back to submersed leaves. If you grew them under the cling wrap, conversion will be faster.

Happy planting!

LL
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#10 User is offline   voidzsg 

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Posted 04 May 2009 - 01:43 AM

View PostLawrenceLee, on Apr 24 2009, 05:24 PM, said:

B. caroliniana is one of the slower growing stem plants. If you are not injecting CO2, it may be slow to propagate a big bunch. A faster way is to grow them emersed.

Just stick stem cuttings in soggy soil/peat/gravel and cover with a plastic cling wrap. Ensure leaves never dry out as you are planting them, if necessary, mist when planting. Grow in cool place with reflected sunlight, never direct sun. Every couple of days, open the clingwrap for a few minutes to refresh the air.

You will find the new leaves change shape. When emersed growth are 2 inch long, you can choose to progressively harden them to air for faster growth, or you can continue as it is. In no time you will have a bunch of plants growing for you to transplant. Always ensure the substrate is flooded.

If you had hardened them, the plants will take a time to convert back to submersed leaves. If you grew them under the cling wrap, conversion will be faster.

Happy planting!

LL



well, i tried to propagate 2 stems of B.caroliniana in a fish bowl without pumping air and they have grew roots and new baby leaves after a few weeks. i am pretty happy about it. :rolleyes:/>

i hope i will grow more of them as i am intend to built a 2nd fish bowl aquarium.
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