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growing grapes

#21 User is offline   deTengs 

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Posted 28 July 2005 - 06:02 PM

cabernet sauvignon x chateauneuf-du-pape grafted onto a rioja 500 years' rootstock from the Ebro valley...extremely good with Pimientos del Piquillo :shylaugh:

i dunno lah...I dunno how to ID grapevine, my father tasted the grapes and the auntie selling it didn't know where it came from... :hammer:
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#22 User is offline   Mamat 

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Posted 31 July 2005 - 11:02 AM

Hey all.. went to bangkok last week and came back with 2 marcotted grape cuttings from chatuchak... planted a day after that.. After 2 days the leaves emerged.. and when I checked earlier today, saw some soemthing that look some wat like flower bunches... Oh well, trying not to get too excited. They would probably drop out once they sense it is not the right growing conditions for them to set flowers... will see if it grows bigger and perhaps.. some grapes might actually ripen there.. lets all keep our fingers crossed... am just really hoping that they'd develop into fruits.. or at least mature flowers for now.. Tks for reading
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#23 User is offline   looiht 

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  Posted 04 June 2008 - 02:22 AM

View Posttualiap, on May 14 2005, 10:08 PM, said:

grapes can grow here, right? anyone succeeded?


I live in Penang and have 15 different of grape vines in my garden, besides apple, pear and plum. Out of the 15 only 3 varieties are sweet. You must choose an European grape variety like White Malaga, Cardinal, etc. They are harder to grow as they will not tolerate clayey soil and need very good drainage but the fruits are sweet.
The correct pruning method is very important. If you spur prune an Isabella grape vine you will not get any fruit as the flowers will only form after the 5th bud. A lot of varieties need cane pruning to fruit.
I get lots of grapes on my vines but unfortunately the sour ones are not very nice to eat.

This post has been edited by looiht: 10 October 2008 - 01:57 AM

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#24 User is offline   mm 

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Posted 04 June 2008 - 08:08 AM

View Postlooiht, on Jun 4 2008, 02:22 AM, said:

The correct pruning method is very important. If you spur prune an Isabella grape vine you will not get any fruit as the flowers will only form after the 5th bud. A lot of varieties need cane pruning to fruit.

Hi Looiht. Could you elaborate on the correct way to prune an Isabella? I have a small one I recently acquired, and it's currently left to it own devices. Also, is the Isabella one of your 3 sweet varieties? Thanks.
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#25 User is offline   looiht 

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  Posted 05 June 2008 - 12:51 AM

Isabella is sour and has a funny foxy taste. During the dry season the Isabella grapes are sour but can be eaten although not that nice. During the wet season the grapes are extremely horrible.
The sweet grapes are European grapes like White Malaga, Ribier, Cardinal, IAC, etc. These are the ones grown in Thailand and the Phillippines for table grapes.

For Isabella, prune everything except 2 strong canes growing from from the main cane and leave 8 to 15 buds on each cane depending on the wine. If the vine is healthy leave 15 buds. If it is unhealthy leave 8 buds. Always remember grapes, especially in the Tropics will only fruit from canes growing from one year old wood only. Canes growing from the main cane which could be many years old will not fruit.

This post has been edited by looiht: 10 October 2008 - 01:38 AM

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#26 User is offline   looiht 

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Posted 05 June 2008 - 01:09 AM

I tried to post the photos of my Isabella grape and Packham pear. However the photos do not seem to appear in my post.

This post has been edited by looiht: 05 June 2008 - 01:14 AM

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#27 User is offline   mm 

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Posted 05 June 2008 - 01:18 AM

Thanks looiht. I got the Isabella because it was supposed to be mildew resistant, and with a strong flavour.

View Postlooiht, on Jun 5 2008, 12:51 AM, said:

Isabella is sour and has a funny foxy taste. During the dry season the Isabella grapes are sour but can be eaten although not that nice. During the wet season the grapes are extremely horrible.

What's a foxy taste? I suppose "extremely horrible" could be construed as "strong flavour" as well. :huh:/> Anyway, if it does fruit, guess I'll pass the fruits on to my mum to make vinegar.
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#28 User is offline   mm 

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Posted 05 June 2008 - 01:22 AM

View Postlooiht, on Jun 5 2008, 01:09 AM, said:

I tried to post the photos of my Isabella grape and Packham pear. However the photos do not seem to appear in my post.

You can find the instructions here : http://www.greencult...p?showtopic=684
Some of the info and screen shots may not be exactly the same anymore, as photobucket has updated their interface, but the basic principles are the same.

This post has been edited by mm: 05 June 2008 - 01:22 AM

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#29 User is offline   looiht 

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Posted 05 June 2008 - 10:13 PM

Photos of my Isabella grapes and Packham pear.
My Isabella grapes can have up to 30 bunches. I think this must be the only Packham pear in Malaysia.

Foxy taste is a funny sickly sourish sweet taste. It is a horrible taste.

Isabella grapes grow easily in Malaysia and does not need much care except for correct pruning to fruit. I have a few Isabella vines but have cut them all down except for one. I also have Black Current, Mampan, Kit Fung, White Malaga, Brazilian and quite a lot of unnamed varieties. I have 4 and not 3 sweet varieties. They are White Malaga and 3 unnamed varieties.
Isabella is not worth growing. It will only be for decoration only.

My Isabella Grapes
http://i279.photobucket.com/albums/kk156/looiht/IMG0045R.jpg
My Packham Pear
http://i279.photobucket.com/albums/kk156/looiht/IMG0047R.jpg

This post has been edited by looiht: 08 June 2008 - 01:59 AM

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#30 User is offline   mm 

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Posted 05 June 2008 - 10:27 PM

Why do the pears look so disfigured? And does the brown covering disappear as the pear grows, 'cos the packham pears we see in the supermarket are huge and green.
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#31 User is offline   shamrock 

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Posted 05 June 2008 - 10:38 PM

View Postlooiht, on Jun 4 2008, 02:22 AM, said:

I live in Penang and have 15 different of grape vines in my garden, besides apple, pear and plum. Out of the 15 only 3 varieties are sweet. You must choose an European grape variety like White Malaga, Concord, etc. They are harder to grow as they will not tolerate clayey soil and need very good drainage but the fruits are sweet.
The correct pruning method is very important. If you spur prune an Isabella grape vine you will not get any fruit as the flowers will only form after the 5th bud. A lot of varieties need cane pruning to fruit.
I get lots of grapes on my vines but unfortunately the sour ones are not very nice to eat.


apple, pear and plum? fantastic! how did you manage it? did you buy the plant from a garden centre or did you grow them from seed? can you post pictures of the apple, plum and blackcurrant?

This post has been edited by shamrock: 05 June 2008 - 10:39 PM

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#32 User is offline   looiht 

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Posted 05 June 2008 - 11:29 PM

I do not know what the brown spots are. I think they must be caused by the rain. Anyway they rub off. In any case most of them disappear when the pears get bigger. The pears are as sweet as the ones you buy in the market.

Most of my fruit trees are flown in from Australia. I had a peach tree too but it died off. I did not know how to take of them before. Most fruit trees from dry areas like Australia must be planted in mounds of earth as water logging will kill them.
Trouble with apples, plums and pears are that they need cross pollination before the fruit will form. My apple trees flower often. Unfortunately the different varieties flower at different times. I had a Rom Beauty which was self pollinating. There were lots of fruit but the fruit were only half the size of normal apples. The apples were sweet and as good as the imported ones. I was told that I have to reduce the number of apples per bunch to get bigger fruit. The Rom Beauty apple tree had died. I do not know where I kept the photos. I will post them if I can find them. I have more than 10 different varieties of apple in my garden.

I have 2 varieties of plum but they flower at different times, so no chance of cross pollination. Fortunately my pear tree is self-pollinating although the Packham pear normally do not self-pollinate.

I also have Acerola cherry, jujube (Chinese date), Brazilian tree grape and Brazilian cherry as well as Lorena (Australian custard apple)

To get more plants I bud graft the ones I brought in from Australia on rootstock I grew from seed.

If you ever plant any of the sweet European grapes like While Malaga, Concord, etc. you must plant them in mounds of earth, 2 ft to 3 ft high with sandy soil. Mix river sand with humus in equal proportions. Clay soil will kill them.

The Black Current is just a black grape. Unfortunately the grapes are sour. Obviously not suitable for our tropical climate.

This post has been edited by looiht: 08 June 2008 - 01:58 AM

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#33 User is offline   looiht 

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Posted 06 June 2008 - 03:19 AM

My Jujube (aka Chinese Date/Taiwan Apple)
http://i279.photobucket.com/albums/kk156/looiht/PICT0031.jpg
My Australian Passion Fruit
http://i279.photobucket.com/albums/kk156/looiht/PICT0032.jpg
My Brazilian Grape
http://i279.photobucket.com/albums/kk156/looiht/PICT0033.jpg
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#34 User is offline   shamrock 

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Posted 06 June 2008 - 05:42 AM

how did you get them in fr australia - did you apply for special clearance? wondering how to get a grafted dwarf avocado plant fr there. btw, i love that jujube photo.
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#35 User is offline   Kingfisher 

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Posted 06 June 2008 - 11:08 AM

The pears look rusty. :D/>

Can the Jujube be eaten?
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#36 User is offline   shamrock 

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Posted 06 June 2008 - 12:52 PM

the jujube should be the same as those fresh ones sold in the market, right, looiht? the skin is brownish and its ever so crunchy - sweet too.
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#37 User is offline   looiht 

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Posted 06 June 2008 - 04:01 PM

The Jujube can be eaten and taste really nice.

In the tropics you have to cover the fruit from the rain if you want a nice looking fruit. Even grapes have to be covered otherwise berry rot will set in. I have not bothered to cover the sour grape varieties I have, like the Isabella, Brazilian, Mampan, etc. I only cover the sweet ones with an opaque plastic bag open at the end.

My wife is Australian. I get her relations to send the plants to me by courier. Remember there must not be any earth otherwise they will be quarantined or confiscated. It also depends on your luck. Even without earth they can still quarantine the plants. The plants will be dead by the time you get them as they do not water them. My friend at MARDI told me that a lot of their plants are received dried up after being quarantined although MARDI is a Government Agency.

When I go to Australia for holidays, I will bring some plants back. With some luck and a nice customs officer I will be able to bring them in.

This post has been edited by looiht: 06 June 2008 - 04:07 PM

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#38 User is offline   shamrock 

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Posted 06 June 2008 - 10:24 PM

hi looiht, thanks for the tip. the plants cant have been very big for it to be couriered, right? or were they drastically pruned for the purpose?
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#39 User is offline   looiht 

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Posted 07 June 2008 - 01:23 AM

The plants were pruned to about 2 feet high when they were flown in. If you want plants flown in make sure that all soil are washed off first. Most countries will not allow plants with soil in. Just cover the roots with wet tissue paper and a plastic bag. You can fly in quite a few plants this way. However courier charges are very expensive.
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#40 User is offline   shamrock 

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Posted 07 June 2008 - 06:29 AM

how long does it take to reach you by courier, looiht? sorry i have so many questions ...
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